All posts filed under: Miscellenia

Gatsby frocks and Garden Party Frocks: 20s & 30s dress design

One of the things I really love about sewing is how few patterns there actually are: in modern sewing, all you need is a bodice block, a skirt block, and a trouser block, and you can make just about anything! The same holds true for historical sewing: one 1770s dress pattern can be adapted for a whole range of looks: the under-bodice to a pet-en-l’aire or robe a la francaise, the bodice to a robe a la anglaise or pierrot jacket etc. etc. I’ve been playing with the idea of a single, adaptable patterns for different eras, particularly the 1920s and 30s, for a while now.  The 20s and 30s inspired a huge variety of dress looks, but if you really look at most ’20s and early ’30s dresses, they use the same basic template, and create all the variety through elaborate seaming and interesting fabrics. My Gran’s Garden dress, 1924 Hula Goddess Dress, 1930s Sea at Sunset evening gown, Spotty Nautical dress, Little Bit of Red dress, and  the Frumpy Dress were all made …

The Great Wellington Craft Crawl: Part II

After the success of the outer-suburb Craft Crawl, and after letting out pocketbooks recover from it, the lovely ladies of the Wellington Sewing Bloggers and I convened to do the CBD half of the Craft & Textile Lover’s Guide to Wellington as a Craft Crawl. This one was quite fun because it really was a crawl (well, a stroll) – you can visit every one of the delicious crafty shops in central Wellington in one easy walk. The craft crawl started out with just myself, Gemma of 66 Stitches (who writes exactly like she talks – and it’s adorable and always makes me smile!  You have to imagine it in a very strong but quite attractive Aussie accent) and Juliet of Crazy Gypsy Chronicles (who keeps the sewing awesomeness of the WSB going in Palmy).  At Stop 2 we were joined by Zara of Off-Grid Chic (Yay! A repeat from CC Part 1)  and on stop 5 we picked up Sophie-Lee of Pins & Noodles (who manages to be a doctor and a talented seamstress – talk about overachieving!).  Plus, we got to see …