All posts tagged: 1913

Rate the Dress: Poiret Negligee of 1913

Last week I gave you a double Rate the Dress, with a fantastical winter scene and two different outfits to Rate.  Overall you liked the outfits but thought some of the details were a bit silly.  The detail that all liked was the military frogging on the brunettes jacket, and she rated an impressive 9.2 out of 10, leaving poor blondie with her miss-matched skirt to trail at 7.7 out of 10.  Gentlemen may prefer blonds, but costume enthusiasts don’t always think they are best dressed! If you follow me on Facebook you’ll know my opinion of this week’s Rate the Dress, but I couldn’t resist posting it here.  It’s so very festive, and perfect for the upcoming Bi/Tri/Quadri/Quin/Sex/Septi/Octo/Nona/Centennial Challenge coming up in the Historical Sew Fortnightly. Festive isn’t always good though.  Sometimes festive can look like a bad costume.  And certainly not everyone likes bright yellow.  Even at the height of Poiret’s popularity he was sometimes accused of sacrificing taste for shock value.  Has this garment strayed into tacky, or does it manage the balance of …

Rate the Dress: Blue and Green in 1913

Last week’s striped 1680s frock did very well indeed, with most of you loving it.  It rated an impressive round 9 out of 10, missing out on a perfect score because of her awkward headscarf (hey a girl’s got to keep her hair tidy in the wind!) and the fringing.  I’m clearly not the only one who doesn’t like fringe. I have no idea what last weeks frock has to do with this weeks frock.  I could get really convoluted and say something about from stripes to dots, or your liking the classic ‘go together’ red, white, and blue, but what do you think of the classic no-no of blue and green etc, etc.  In reality though, I wanted to post the 17th century dress, and now I want to post this one.  That is it. But now that I’ve mentioned it, this week’s dress is indeed in blue and green.  Clearly Jeanne Hallee and the wearer didn’t think that the colours needed ‘something in between’, or the wearer wasn’t afraid to be a fool, or …