All posts tagged: 20th century

Rate the Dress: 1930s Tangerine lace

Whether or not you liked last week’s 1890s Rate the Dress ensemble hinged very much on how you feel about three things: bright cherry red, big lace dickey-collars, and BIG sleeves.  For most of you, even if you really liked one or the other, all three were a bit much, bringing the rating down to 7.5 out of 10. This week I’m toning things down a little: going from red to orange, and from enormous sleeves to sleek 1930s.  This dress, which was sold by Whitaker Auctions in their Spring 2013 sale, combines demure and assertive, with delicate floral lace in bold tangerine orange, and a figure-hugging silhouette with sweet ruffled collar and an optional jacket. Without the jacket the dress is sleeveless, with a ruffled bib collar, and a slim skirt that flares at the hem. The back of the dress plunges in a deep, spine-revealing V. For a bit of coverage, the ensemble includes a matching jacket with cut-on sleeves and a sparkling button to fasten. What do you think?  Do you like the …

Rate the Dress: Vionnet does gold and bows

Last week I showed you an 1860s dress in buff alpaca with red trim.  I was sure the lopsided bodice trim would be noticed, and wondered how much it would affect the rating.  While you all agreed it wasn’t ideal, I don’t think changing it would have hugely affected the rating: those of you who loved the dress liked it despite the wonky trim, and the rest of you found the dress boring, even with crazy tassels.  So the rating came in at 6.9 out of 10, which doesn’t really reflect how any of you felt about it! I actually thought the dress was rather awesome.  It clearly had some issues (asymmetrical tassels just over the bust is not a good thing), but every time I looked at it I imagined it being worn by an 1860s superhero.  It’s Crinoline Girl!  She’s firing lightening bolts from the zig-zags on her arms!  Whipping her Tassels of Doom (alas, I’m not very imaginative when it comes to naming weaponry) off from around her waist and using them to knock criminals …

Rate the Dress: Adrian does daily life

Last week I showed you Emily Warren Roebling in her court gown – as a painting, a photograph, and the extent gown.  Most of you appreciated being able to compare all possible versions of the dress, though that actually ended up dragging ratings down a bit, as each version showed you something you wished wasn’t so obvious in another.  It also made things a little hard for me, as some of you rated each different version, and I had to figure out what rating to take.  Overall, Emily came it at 8.9 out of 10, with kudos for balancing event appropriate fashions, her age, and the wacky factor of court dress. This week we’re toning down the formality, and cranking up the unconventional factor.  Gilbert Adrian was primarily a costume designer, responsible for some of the most iconic costumes of the ’30s & ’40s, and for creating the classic broad-shouldered, slim-hipped ‘Adrian line’ silhouette.  In addition to film costumes, Adrian designed ready to wear garments, though they often had a slightly theatrical twist, as with this dress: Without …