All posts tagged: tutorial

How to add pockets to the Scroop Modern Fantail skirt thedreamstress.com

How to add pockets to the Scroop Modern Fantail skirt

A lot of people have asked about pockets for the Scroop Modern Fantail skirt. I really wanted to include pockets in the pattern.  As I developed the pattern I tested multiple styles of pockets on the skirt: welt, in-seam, in-seam with standing welt, horizontal, back angled, front angled, patch.  Unfortunately none of them fit my requirements for being sympathetic to the aesthetic of the skirt, flattering on most body types, successful in all the fabrics that the skirt could be made out of, large enough to make the aesthetic and difficulty compromises worthwhile, and within the difficulty range of the pattern.  I didn’t want to include a pocket that compromised my vision for the pattern, just for the sake of having one.  So, the pattern is pocket-less. Of all the ways I tried to include pockets, by far the most successful was the back-angled drop pocket set into the side panel.  They weren’t perfect: they do make the skirt a bit more casual, and you can’t put bulky things in them, so they didn’t quite make the …

Tutorial: How to unpick and wash a vintage kimono

I love re-using vintage kimono silk for new garments.  I’ve used it for the Vionnet dress, my Deco Echo top, the jacket and over-skirt of my Japonisme dress, the Carte Blanche gown, the lining of my 1770s Lady Anne Darcy dress, my (as yet unfinished) 1770s jacket, the sash of my chemise a la reine, and a few other garments.  Yep.  I really love re-using kimono silk! Here is how to unpick and prep a silk kimono for re-use. This time I’m working with a silk crepe under-kimono.  You can tell it is meant to be worn as an under-layer because of the white collar cover.  It is unlined, and calf length, but the process for pulling it apart is the same as for any kimono. First, some basic things about kimono. Kimono fabric is a special fabric woven to a narrow width, between 13.5″ & 16″.  Kimono are constructed entirely of rectangular shapes, mainly in full widths of the fabric.  In places where the kimono uses narrower widths, the extra fabric is just folded …

Tutorial: self fabric bias binding

I’m long overdue for a tutorial, and long overdue for an update on some sewing progress, so I’m multitasking. I love multitasking. I hemmed my not-so frothy fairy dress (now dubbed the Marianne gown, because it combines Sense and Sensibility) with self fabric bias binding, which is my favourite hemming technique. It takes a little longer, but it provides a beautiful effect, especially on curved hems.  It is also very strong, and can be replaced if the hem gets soiled (unlike traditional hems). Whether you use it for hems, or any other technique, self fabric bias binding is a useful thing to know how to make.  You can buy metal tools to make it, but I find they don’t save much time, and don’t give you nearly as much flexibility in terms of size. To make your own self fabric bias binding, cut bias strips of the fabric you intend to use. This tutorial uses many of the same techniques as my self-fabric piping tutorial, so you might want to check that out. Your strips …