All posts tagged: Victorian

May detail, Cycle of frescos of the twelve labors of the months, Trento (Italy), Castello del Buonconsiglio (Bishops Castle), Torre del'Aquila (Tower of the eagle), otherwise unknown Master Wenceslas of Bohemia, after 1397

The Historical Sew Monthly 2018: Inspiration for Challenge #5: Specific to a Time of Day or Year

The Historical Sew Monthly 2018 is well underway now, and it’s my duty and honour to write the inspiration post for our fifth challenge of the year: Specific to a Time (of Day or Year). I was slightly panicked when I realised this theme would fall to me.  I’m not at all an expert at pre-1700s fashions, and this is a challenge that’s particularly tricky before the 19th century (ish), when specific garments for different times of day became common.  But with help from my awesome co-moderators, I’ve found examples from a range of eras – enjoy! In chronological order: This ca. 1400 cycle of frescos of the months from the Castello del Buonconsiglio in Trento, Italy, provides a wonderful look at late Medieval fashions by season, with warm layers for winter snowfights: Flowing garments for spring romance (note the love-knots on the gentleman’s tunic): And sunhats and light shirts (and sandals!) for harvest labours.  The sunhats do double duty for this challenge, being both daytime, and summer, specific: Elizabethan costume plates also show wonderful …

Ball gown, Emile Pingat (French active-1860–96) ca. 1864, French, silk, Metropolitan Museum of Art C.I.69.33.12a–c

Rate the Dress: An enormous Pingat ballgown

I enjoyed looking for examples of Pingat creations so much while writing my review of ‘My Official Wife’ that I had to choose one for today’s Rate the Dress.  To give a contrast to the ca. 1890s fashion of Savage’s novel, and the almost-modern dress Adrian dress from last week, I went with an 1860s ballgown big enough to smuggle an entire aviaries worth of budgerigars underneath. Last week: A cubist inspired Gilbert Adrian evening ensemble An interesting, but not surprising, mix of reactions to the Adrian dress.  I say not surprising, because I had a little spare time (for once!) when I wrote the rate the dress, and a made a list of predictions of what would be said – and you hit every one of them, from muddy colour complaints to notes of wrinkles (sans a comparison to mushrooms 😉 ).  And added the bit about it reminding you of Neapolitan ice cream. I’m glad I wasn’t quite alone in thinking that a bit of mint makes Neapolitan so much better. The Total: 7 …

Rate the Dress: An 1887 Wedding Dress Two Ways

This week’s Rate the Dress is an extremely practical wedding ensemble, for an the bride of an extremely wealthy fabric-weavers son.  How will it compare to last week’s anything-but-practical 1920s dress? Last week: a ca. 1925 playing card themed evening dress, possibly by Poiret Mixed reactions to that one.  A few of you loved it.  A few of you loved it because it was awesomely tacky.  Some of you just saw the awkwardness (not helped by presentation, but hey, an auction house isn’t a museum photographing items for display or a book), and some of you just saw the tackiness. The Total: 7.8 out of 10 Not quite a full house… This week: A Wedding Ensemble from 1887 This wedding ensemble was worn by Louise Whitfield for her marriage to business magnate & philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.  Carnegie was one of the richest men in the US, and at 51 to her 30, was 21 years Whitfield’s senior.  He’d refused to marry while his mother was still alive, and the wedding was held six months after …