Rate the Dress: Deco stripes in 1923

Last week your reactions to the 1860s girl’s pink & white striped party frock were quite divided.  Most of you said something along the lines of “cutest dress ever!” or “I would have felt like a princess in it”.  Some of you, however, had horrible experiences with being forced to wear frilly dresses as a kid, and you didn’t like it for that reason.  Those in favour of pretty princess dresses pulled it in at a 8.4 out of 10.

This week, lets leave any chance of saccharine behind and look at a dress inspired by my time at Art Deco Weekend.  This frock from the Met incorporates clever angles and curves and pleats and stripes, all while maintaining a sleek silhouette – very Art Deco.

Dress, ca 1923, probably French, silk and cotton, Metropolitan Museum of Art

When I polled you about your least favourite fashion eras the 1920s won (lost?) by a landslide.  So this dress is a real risk.  Will it fall foul of your dislike of the 20s?  Or will you like the simple, comfortable, easy-wear, restrained but colourful, Art Deco inspired shift dress?

Rate the Dress on a Scale of 1 to 10

Pretty blouses for Christmas wear

Are you sick of 1911 yet?  I hope not!  This will be my last post of this era for a while though.

A charming selection of blouses from the Girl's Own Paper

The full page view

3811, with 'trimmings of velvet bands', 3860, 'a graceful style for a girl, and one that would make up nicely in silk

The very feminine 3815, and 3006, with 'fullness given by box pleats'

3819 is 'a useful afternoon blouse made up in velveteen'

Front and back views of the blouses

Styles for girls of all ages, 1911

This is another title that just tickles me pink.  I do wonder if The Girl’s Own Paper was using it in the modern sense (as in ‘the child in all of us’ etc.) or that they meant ‘girls from 8-18′ or (worst of all) ‘anyone unmarried’.  Whatever the case, I’d certainly wear some of these styles!

Styles for girls of all ages, Girl's Own Paper, Dec 1911

First some blouses for older girls:

I love that the one on the right is described as a 'severe style'!

The blouse patterns are all (according to the magazine) based on the same basic shirt pattern, and can be made in any fabric, though hand-embroidery is most effective on linen.

What is she looking at?

Then some littler girl’s clothes:

Fashionable indeed! That's quite a hat!

And a sailor frock for school girls (aren't those details scrumptious?)

And finally, a well fitted coat for someone of indeterminate girlishness:

The seaming over the belt = totally fabulous!

 

Meet the Dreamstress

Leimomi Oakes is the Dreamstress, a textile historian, seamstress, designer, speaker and museum professional. Leimomi is available for educational and entertaining presentations, textile and fashion advice, special commissions and events. Click to learn more

Come sew with us!


Archives