All posts tagged: 1840s

Rate the Dress: Mid-Century Mourning

The last Rate the Dress choice was frothy Edwardian frills in pastel hues. This week it’s frothy mid-19th century frills in sable-on-sable. One of the most common dislikes for the Hallée dress was the colour. Perhaps you’ll like black better? Last Week: a ca. 1900 afternoon dress by Hallée in lace and eu de nil Hallée dress was quite popular, as has been the case with most Edwardian froth on Rate the Dress. Some of you weren’t entirely sold on the colours, or the vertical lines (although the photo is rather misleading – the vertical inserts are totally symmetrical, some are just hidden in the folds). The Total: 8.5 out of 10 Not as good as the week before – as a couture piece, it wasn’t as good an example of its type as last week’s dressmaker’s creation.  This week: a ca. 1850 mourning dress. This week’s Rate the Dress will be a little bit different. It’s a full dress, but one that is so dependent on the accompanying garments and accessories that it’s essentially un-rateable …

Day dress, 1841-42, silk, metal, crinoline, FIDM Museum, 2010.5.23A-D

Rate the Dress: fun with stripes, 1840s style

This week’s Rate the Dress goes from bold, bright stripes, to soft, subtle stripes. Last Week: a early-mid teens dress in bold stripes and bold cut Last week’s rate the dress wasn’t very popular with some of you. Whether it was the fabrics, the cut, or the fichu-effect lace, almost everyone found something to criticise. Except for Sarah, holding the flag for a perfect 10! Many of you also criticised the presentation, which isn’t one of the things that we take into account with Rate the Dress. Not every garment is robust enough to be steamed and pressed for presentation, and even when a garment is, a museum can’t always afford the time, money, and expert hours it takes to steam a garment, pad a mannequin, and create proper supports. If museums only shared photos of garments they had the resources to perfectly present, we’d have far fewer garments to admire and research. The Total: 5.5 out of 10 So extremely high fashion 1913-1914ish was not your thing! This week: an early 1840s dress with blue …

Dress, 1845–50, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Annie M. Colson, 1929, 2009.300.630

Rate the Dress: Silk Stripes

After last week’s lush excess of trim and embellishment, the garment I’ve chosen for this week is simple and restrained, relying on the cut and layout of the fabric for interest. Last Week: a natural form era dress in red silk with rosettes and roses Some of you thought last week’s dress was holiday perfection. Others thought it looked like an over-dressed Christmas tree, and not in a good way. Interestingly, one of the things that came in for a lot of criticism was the way the skirt flared out from the hips. That’s a classic dressmaking trick to create the illusion of a small waist. The Total: 8 out of 10 (I personally thought the dress was just the thing for my favourite Christmas movie. Santa’s everywhere at once, and some of him landed on the dress…) This week: an 1840s dress in striped silk The Metropolitan Museum of Art identifies this dress as a ‘visiting dress’, but I think a more correct description would be a formal day or dinner dress. Perfectly appropriate for visiting, …