All posts tagged: 18th century

The Augusta Stays vs The Cassandra Stays thedreamstress.com

The Augusta Stays & The Cassandra Stays – what’s the difference?

We’ve had so many questions about the difference between the Scroop + Virgils Fine Goods Augusta Stays and the Scroop + Virgil’s Fine Goods Cassandra Stays that I’m bumping the planned blog post about that up the queue and answering it before I even share the (absolutely amazing!) tester makes. Although the Augusta and Cassandra Stays are both 18th century stays, they are quite different patterns.  Here’s how, and which you should choose depending on what you want as a costumer! (pssst, don’t forget that the Cassandra Stays are 15% off until Thur 22 Feb, midnight NZDT) Silhouette & Date – the difference between the two styles The Augusta Stays are based on extant stays & stay patterns dating to between 1775 and 1789, such as this pair: (learn more about the extant stays that inspired the Augusta pattern here) Stays of this style are fairly short-waisted, with partial front lacing which makes the bust fit adjustable.  The goal of these stays was to create a short, curvaceous silhouette, with a ‘prow front’ that thrust …

Rate the Dress: 1770s recycled silk

Last week’s dress was very formal and monochrome, with extremely geometric, ordered lace.  This week we’re going for much brighter colours, and a print that’s quite bizarre: literally. Let’s find out what you think about it! Last Rate the Dress: an 1890s reception gown in ivory with black lace You know what some of you really, really don’t like?  Bows.  Yeeeeeeeeep.  Those of you who didn’t love this didn’t love it for the bow, or simply because it was generally too dramatic. But many of you did love it!  And, as for me, well, my favourite part was the bow. The Total: 8.4 out of 10 Better than the dress before, but not exactly a smash hit. This week: a 1770s dress from 1708-10 bizarre silk lampas I love the way fabric got re-used in the 18th century, and this dress is a great example of that re-use: fabric from 1708-10, re-made as a fashionable dress in the 1770s.  It’s one of the earliest 18th century fabrics used again for a full late 18th century …