All posts filed under: Rate the dress

Dress, ca. 1805, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Charles Blaney, 1926, 2009.300.2314

Rate the Dress: Empire Era Details

As neither patterned fabric nor bold contrast were exactly popular last week, this week I’ve picked something completely different: a monochrome Empire era dress that would be boring, except for subtle details that set it apart. Last Week: an 1890s day dress with all the trimmings Whatever you saw in last week’s Rorschart test of a dress, it certainly gave you something to talk about. It’s the first Rate the Dress in quite a while to break 50+ comments! Some of you thought it was way, way too much (Lynne said her eyes felt they needed a lie down after looking at it). Others loved how bold it was, how unafraid to really embrace the trends of the time. And some of you were weirded out by the ground fabric, particularly in combination with the strong red velvet. However you felt about it, you felt about it strongly. I don’t think we’ve ever had quite so many 2s and 10s all on the same Rate the Dress! The Total: 6 out of 10 If you …

Dress, Emile Pingat, Paris, 1897, Silk velvet & silk compound weave with supplementary warp floats, linen lace, cotton, silk, and metallic-thread applique & glass beads, LACMA M.2012.95.123a-b

Rate the Dress: Red Velvet & Rorschach blobs

This week Rate the Dress goes from very literal trompe l’oeil ruffles, to a dress with an abstract pattern that becomes a textile Rorschach test: what do you see in the ripples and blobs? Last Week: a first-bustle-era morning dress in border-print cotton How you rated last week’s dress really hinged on how you felt about the border print and the trompe l’oeil ruffle. Some of you really enjoyed the print, and thought it was inventive and witty. Others found it fussy, saccharine, and mismatched. And then there was a third segment who liked elements of the dress, but didn’t feel it pulled off the overall look. The Total: 7 out of 10 An unresolved rating for an unresolved dress. This week: an 1890s day dress with all the trimmings This week’s Rate the Dress is an 1890s day dress that might have been worn by the daughter of last week’s dresses owner: it’s equally decadent, impractical, and inventive in its design and use of fabric. Pingat was a top tier Parisian couturier in the …

http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/107809

Rate the Dress: Bustle Era Border Print

Last week’s Rate the Dress was an evening dress for an event that didn’t usually call for evening wear. This week’s Rate the Dress is a morning dress for…well, presumably exactly what a morning dress was usually worn for. Last Week: a 1920s evening-dress as wedding-dress  Last week’s wedding dress may have been a very unconventional choice, but it was a successful one! Almost everyone loved it, with the few slightly lower scores (it’s a good dress when 8 is the low score!) coming from people who just don’t like the 20s, and couldn’t quite get behind the corsage. The Total: 9.6 out of 10 Resounding approval for the brides pick! This week: a first-bustle-era morning dress in border-print cotton This week I present an 1870s morning dress in a striking border-print cotton with trompe l’oeil ruffle effect. In the 1870s a morning (not to be confused with mourning!) dress was an informal dress, usually made in less dressy fabrics, such as cotton. A morning dress was worn at home in the earlier part of the …