All posts filed under: Rate the dress

Rate the Dress: a ca. 1910 dress with purple polka dots

It’s Rate the Dress day again!  Every week I feature a historical garment – whether an extant original, or an artistic depiction, and you have your say about its aesthetic merits within the context of its time.  This week we look at a ca. 1910 dress in lavender purple polka dots. Last week: 1720s-40s theatrically-embroidered casaquin For once I was absolutely correct in predicting the reaction to last week’s striking embroidered casaquin.  The white linen and vivid wool embroidered garment flaunted the wearer’s knowledge and sophistication, as well as their ability to afford an incredibly expensive informal garment. Most of you were major fans, but a few of you weren’t having a bar of it.  I strongly suspect the casaquin was just as divisive when it was originally worn. The Total: 8.8 out of 10. Tons of 10s, a few middlings, and one spectacularly bad 2!  And a last-minute comment that was so beautiful that I went and updated the maths, even though I’d already done them, so it could be included in the rating 🙂 …

1890s dress

Rate the Dress: an 1890s dress in floral wool

Last week: Last week’s Doucet-does-Cubism ensemble brought a resounding affirmation of Doucet’s ability to adapt to the post-Edwardian fashion world.  The only major quibbles were whether the cape and beading added or detracted from the outfit.  Some of you were extremely pro cape, and thought it made the outfit.  Some of you were…not.  Same thing with the beading. The Total: 9.7 out of 10! No wonder so many of you have added it to your sewing inspiration list! This week: For this week’s Rate the Dress we’re going back to the 1890s, with this ca. 1893 dress in floral printed wool muslin: Muelle designed costumes for the Paris Opera, so it’s possible that this dress was a stage costume – though costumers also designed clothes, and major stars went to known couturiers (including last week’s Doucet, who designed for the Divine Sarah, among others) for their stage and everyday clothes. The dress, with asymmetrical draping pulled over a very fitted bodice, A-line skirt, and smocked sleeves, combines typical elements of 1890s fashion.  Combined with the …

Doucet does Cubism

Rate the Dress: Doucet does Cubism

It’s Rate the Dress time!  This week we move from exoticism to modernism.  How will the transition go? Last week: an 1840s evening gown with Ottoman-esque embroidery Not only did most of you like last week’s 1840s gold-& floral embroidered evening gown, but the comments unearthed lots of fascinating information about it, and Ottoman inspired embroidery.  Go have a read of them! There were a few niggles about the ‘clunky’ gold trim down the front of the dress, so which brought the rating down a wee bit. The total: 8.1 out of 10 Not too bad! This week: an early ’20s Doucet ensemble We usually associate Doucet with his frothy Edwardian creations, but he was designing well into the 1920s.  His garments continued to change with, and reflect the times, while always linking back to the same passion. Doucet, above all, was an art connoisseur.  His fashion creations were influenced and inspired by his love of art.  He continued to keep abreast of the latest innovations in art, and particularly loved Cubism.  He bought directly …