All posts filed under: Scroop Patterns

Making linen buckram: gum tragacanth vs xathan gum thedreamstress.com

Making Linen Buckram: Gum Tragacanth vs Xanthan Gum

I’ve been doing a lot of experimenting with making linen buckram in the last year and a half, playing with using both historically accurate gum tragacanth, and a much cheaper and easier to source modern equivalent: xanthan gum. We’re getting very close to launching Scroop Pattern’s and Virgil’s Fine Good’s first collaboration: a 1780s stays pattern with extensive historical instruction. Historical stays use linen buckram, so here’s what I’ve learned about it to help you make your own. What is linen buckram? Linen buckram is stiffened linen. It was used in 17th, 18th and early 19th century sewing as support layers where stiffening was needed, such as in stays, stiff collars, stomachers, and hatmaking. It’s made by coating linen with a gum paste, usually gum tragacanth, or xanthan gum, and then letting the gum dry. The more layers of gum that are applied, the stiffer the linen gets. Here is what it looks and sounds like in motion: In addition to historical sewing, I think it has lots of potential for general costuming: particularly for …

Scroop Patterns + Virgil’s Fine Goods Call for Testers

Amber and I want to make sure that our first pattern is as fabulous as possible, so we need testers to help us with that! We’ve already asked a number of testers with specialised skills, so we’re only looking for a few extra testers, but if you’d like to be one of them, keep reading to learn more, and how to apply… The Pattern: 1780s stays which can be made using fully historically accurate techniques, or simpler theatrical techniques. They feature synthetic whalebone (German Plastic) boning, back lacing, and adjustable half-front lacing or a smooth front. Testers: This is an advanced pattern, and we’re looking for testers with prior historical sewing and corsetmaking experience. To be a tester you will also need to: be able to print patterns in A4, A0, US Letter or US full sized Copyshop paper sizes have the time to sew up the item if you agree to be a tester for it – you’ll have one month to completely finish it.  be able to photograph your make being worn, and …

Scroop Patterns + Virgil’s Fine Goods = 18th century awesomeness

I am so excited to announce that Scroop Patterns is going to be collaborating with Amber of Virgil’s Fine Goods to create historically accurate 18th century (and, if those go well, Regency) patterns! Historically accurate print-at-home PDF 18th century patterns have long been top of my costuming wish-list. Out here in NZ, ordering any of the ones from overseas takes weeks, and is extremely expensive. Even if you’re not so far-flung, PDF patterns means that you can buy, print, and get working on your item all within the same hour. (and yes, we’ll be doing paper patterns too!) I’ve considered doing 18th century patterns for Scroop Patterns, but I don’t feel I have the depth of experience needed to make really amazing Georgian patterns: there aren’t enough 18th c garments in NZ for me to study, or experts to learn from. And I really wouldn’t want to do them unless I could be sure they were really, really good. I thought about who did have the experience, and Amber was the obvious choice. She combines …