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1813 Kashmiri Dress thedreamstress.com

Tales from the East: A Fashion History talk at Old Government House, Parramatta, Sydney

My 1813 Kashmiri Dress is currently on display at the Australia National Trust Exhibition; Tales from the East: India & New South Wales, at Old Government House, Parramatta Park, Sydney Australia.

Not only can you go and see it in person if you’re in Sydney, but I’m coming to Australia to be part of a lecture in conjunction with the exhibition

Fashion for India

Saturday 26 May

10:30-11:30

Old Government House, Parramatta Park, Pitt Street Entrance
Parramatta 2150 NSW

Curator Lindie Ward and I will be talking about the Indian influence on Western textiles and fashion.

1813 Kashmiri Dress thedreamstress.com

I may even be wearing something historical and on-theme…

Tales from the East India and NSW Brochure and Programs

ScroopPatterns.com

Hooray! Scroop Patterns now available in paper format!

I’m delighted to announce that selected Scroop Patterns are now available in hard copy!

The Scroop Ngaio Blouse scrooppatterns.com                   The Scroop Rilla Corset Pattern Scrooppatterns.com

Get your paper versions of the Rilla Corset and the Ngaio Blouse exclusively through:

 Wearing History

 http://wearinghistory.clothing


About the patterns:

Hard copy Scroop Patterns are printed on high-quality, medium weight bond paper, with easy to use spiral-bound instruction booklets.  Both patterns and instructions are in full colour.

Wearing History is based in Southern California, USA, and ships worldwide.

In keeping with Scroop Patterns commitment to supporting small businesses, and to reducing waste whenever possible, the hard copy patterns are printed by a small, local to Wearing History, printing company.

And, of course, if you don’t want to wait for shipping, you can always get your digital print-at-home Scroop Patterns through scrooppatterns.com

What’s next?

Even more Scroop Patterns  in hard copy!

Leave a comment to let me know which one you’d like to see in paper next!

WWI era corset, 1910s corset, Rilla corset, corset pattern

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Rate the Dress: Worth takes on three centuries of fashion

Last week’s Rate the dress took us to the 1740s.  This week we’re travelling back in time half a century to ca. 1690, AND forward half a century to ca. 1790, and finishing up ca. 1890, all in one dress.  Only Worth would try that!  But did he succeed?

Last week: An unknown young lady of ca. 1740 by Bartholemew Dandridge

I’m always a bit trepidatious when I post a historical child for Rate the Dress because of the children-as-adults issue.  Luckily the response to our girl-on-the-cusp-of-adolescence was (almost) unanimously positive.  You thought she was perfectly dressed for a young lady in her first almost-grown-up frock, with the ideal balance of frills and boldness.

The Total: 9.3 out of 10

It was the princess dress to appeal to both our inner little-girl and our more critical adult selves!

This week: A House of Worth Reception gown of ca. 1890

This grape purple and pale gold Worth reception gown from ca 1890 is heavy on the historicism.  It has a skirt inspired by mantua fashionable in the 1690s, and a bodice that gives a nod to redingotes fashionable in the 1790s.

The interesting stripes, which run vertically down the front of the skirt and then turn to run horizontally around the hem are an unusual and distinctive design feature.  They aren’t common in many eras, but appear in 1680s & 90s fashion plates:

The House of Worth has added their own twist to the stripe frames, by placing them around elaborate bows which anchor ribbon ‘sashes’ falling from the waist.

Woman’s Two-Piece Dress, Worth, France, Paris, circa 1890, silk faille & silk twill with silk embroidery, linen lace, and silk plain weave trim, LACMA, 55.19a-b

The dress of the skirt is picked up in a sculptural ‘butterfly’ bustle that evokes the the bustling of late 17th and early 18th century mantua

 

Woman’s Two-Piece Dress, Worth, France, Paris, circa 1890, silk faille & silk twill with silk embroidery, linen lace, and silk plain weave trim, LACMA, 55.19a-b

Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Femme de Qualité en Deshabillé d'Esté' Jean LeBlond (France, active circa 1635-1709) France, Paris, 1682 Prints Hand-colored engraving on paper, LACMA M.2002.57.65

Recueil des modes de la cour de France, ‘Femme de Qualité en Deshabillé d’Esté’ Jean LeBlond (France, active circa 1635-1709) France, Paris, 1682 Prints Hand-colored engraving on paper, LACMA M.2002.57.65

While the lower half is all 17th century, the bodice takes its cue from double-breasted Georgian redingotes, with a soft, lacy collar inspired by fichu.

What do you think? Is this tri-cententenial mashup one for the history books?  Or is this take on la modé 16-17-1890 demodé in any era?

Rate the Dress on a Scale of 1 to 10

A reminder about rating – feel free to be critical if you don’t like a thing, but make sure that your comments aren’t actually insulting to those who do like a garment.  Our different tastes are what make Rate the Dress so interesting. However it’s no fun when a comment implies that anyone who doesn’t agree with it, or who would wear a garment, is totally lacking in taste.

(as usual, nothing more complicated than a .5.  I also hugely appreciate it if you only do one rating, and set it on a line at the very end of your comment, so I can find it!  Thanks in advance!)