All posts tagged: 1910s

1917 combinations and petti-slips thedreamstress.com

Combination-a-thon, or how I came to have more wearable combinations than anyone else alive in 2017…

When I was planning my wardrobe for the Fortnight in 1916 I knew I needed lots of combinations to wear under corsets: enough to have a reasonable week’s wearing before I did laundry. I was using Wearing History’s fantastic 1917 combination pattern.  Mid-1910s combinations are serious fabric hogs,  so I rummaged around in my stack of vintage sheets, and unearthed half-a-dozen of the thinnest and most seamed. On my first round of cutting I cut out three, carefully folded them all in one parcel, and set them aside for sewing. (who can guess where this is going?) The next night I cut out another 4, which would give me 8 in total (I already had a completed one): near the upper end of what my research suggested was a normal amount of first-layer undergarments for a middle class woman to have in any single season. A few days later I sat down to sew all the combinations. My first three?  Nowhere to be found!  Determined searching and re-organising failed to unearth them, so I persevered with …

A 1913 beauty, thedreamstress.com

A ca. 1913 beauty

I like picking up old photographs when I find them at antique stores and op shops. Partly I do it because old photographs are fantastic clothing research resources, and partly I do it because it seems so sad that there was a time when people knew them, and knew who they were, and valued and treasured their photographs, and now that link is broken. I’ll never know who most of the people I find in images were, but I can at least carry on a little tidbit of their story. This woman is one of my favourite recent finds: I say woman, because while she’s clearly quite young, and her elaborate hair-bows are very girlish, she appears to be proudly displaying a rather large and gorgeous engagement ring on her left hand. Her outfit is absolutely typical of 1913: skirts had been getting slimmer and higher since 1910, and the cut-on Magyar sleeves were very stylish beginning in 1913.  In a formal studio setting, taking a photograph to commemorate her engagement, she was probably wearing up to …

Rate the Dress: Celebration green in 1912

Last week’s Rate the Dress was a tailored walking ensemble, ca 1900, with raised detailing, all in one fabric.  There was a bit of discussion about whether it would look better with contrasting details, or in a brighter colour, but pretty much everyone was in agreement that it already looked pretty darn fabulous as it was.  It came in at 9.5 out of 10, which is pretty much a perfect score these days. It’s definitely pretty close to perfection for me: it desperately makes me want to rush out and buy a bunch of oatmeal wool, despite the fact that oatmeal is possibly the worst colour possible on me (I just go oatmeal all over.  It’s awful.  ) Tone-on-tone was the only (occasional) complaint about last weeks ensemble, so I’m going to test the theme again, and see how it does this week: This evening gown (according to my ability to translate google translates ability to translate Finnish – if I have any Finnish readers, please do clarify/confirm/elaborate!)  was worn to an event celebrating the centenary of …