All posts tagged: 1910s

Tea Gown, House of Worth (French, 1858–1956), ca. 1910, French, silk, rhinestones, metal, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.3277

Rate the Dress: a Worth tea gown for the wealthiest woman

I gave you an extra few days for Rate the Dress, because last week’s was so late. And I’m still feeling very rushed and busy, so have picked a Rate the Dress that’s all about relaxing, albeit in the poshest way possible. Last Week: an 1860s fancy dress Last week’s Rate the dress was fancy in a different way to this weeks: fancy dress, rather than fancy, fancy. But what we could see of the trim and construction was also quite fancy: indicating a very well made, high quality item, for a client with money to spend on a one-off costume. But that didn’t translate to likes: the ratings were all over the place, from 2 to 10. The final result? The Total: 6.4 out of 10 Personally, I have a sneaking suspicion it would have rated much higher if we could have seen how it was worn: fully accessorised and styled. This week: a tea gown by the House of Worth Tea gowns were always status symbols: the Victorian & Edwardian versions of designer jeans …

A dress made from a 1919 pattern thedreamstress.com

The 1918-19 ‘Not Another Blue Dress’ details

I wore the 1918-19 ‘Not Another Blue Dress’ at Costume College, and loved it just as much as the first time I wore it. I made a few improvements to it, and got some help from friend for a few more, and paired it with my Costumers for Climate Action sash. For improvements, I loved the detailed yoke I’d made, but felt the sleeves were a bit plain in comparison. I had just a few scraps of the yoke fabric left, and by careful placement (and one small mend, which you can just see in the photo below if you look closely) I managed to cut a set of cuffs. I’d paired the cuffs with fancy cut-glass buttons that imitate jet, and added matching buttons on the shoulder, where the yoke opens. For more texture and visual interest, and a little bit of colour, Hvitr the tassel queen made me a set of tassels: And Madame O the embroideress extraordinaire embroidered little motifs taken from a 1910s embroidery manual on the sash ends – no …

Rate the Dress: a 1910s suit

Last week’s steel buttons and hat trim weren’t popular with most of you, and I know that this week’s buttons, and buttons, and buttons won’t be popular with at least one of you! So apologies to anyone with koumpounophobia. However, if you are a fan of buttons, maybe you’ll enjoy this week’s Rate the Dress. Last Week: a 1780s redingote in purple silk Alas, as fun as I find fashion plates, you don’t find them very fun to rate – there . There were things to like about the ensemble though: the rich colour, and jaunty collar. No one was a fan of the long torso and the scalloped peplums of the redingote, just like no-one liked them on the yellow 1780s number we looked at a few months back. And the hat definitely wasn’t winning friends and influencing the rating in a positive manner. The Total: 7.8 out of 10 Not terrible…but certainly not great. This week: a 1910s suit with all the (button) trimmings This week we’re going from a late 18th century suit, …