All posts tagged: Edwardian

Rate the Dress: Doucet goes for gold

Happy New Years! To celebrate the holiday, I’ve picked a Rate the Dress suitable for wearing to a grand New Years event: a glimmering gold number by Doucet. Last week: a ca. 1821 afternoon dress in red & green I really wondered how last week’s zig-zagged 1820s dress would go.  The 1820s have not exactly been popular in Rate the Dress.  And that fabric was, by any stretch of the imagination, obnoxious.  (I should point out that I sometimes love obnoxious!).  The fabric definitely lost the dress some points.  But other raters felt that the obnoxious fabric somehow balanced the weird 1820s details perfectly – gaining it points.  One thing most could agree on was that the hem ruffles weren’t working. The Total: 8.1 out of 10. Respectable, but not fabulous.  Better than the 1910s dress of the week before.  It’s not often 1820s beats 1910s! This week: a Doucet evening dress in glittering gold organza: This Doucet evening dress might have been worn to a New Years eve ball.  Perhaps in 1900!  It’s just glittery …

1900s day dress, 1900s fashion

Rate the Dress: a ca 1900 day dress gets the blues

Last week’s 1750s Robe a la Francaise was far better received than I had anticipated.  I thought the muddy colours and square shape would put people off.  If they weren’t enough, there was the lacklustre presentation and dreadful wig. Despite all those, you found the back pleating sufficiently swooshy, and the fabric sufficiently luxurious, to keep all your ratings at 6 and above.  The ratings averaged out at 8.3 out of 10.  8 (or 8.5) was the most commonly rated # for the dress, so for once the ratings reflect the general reaction. This week: A ca. 1900 day dress This week I’ve chosen something in a nice bright, bold colour: a ca 1900 day dress in deep blue printed silk: The silhouette of this dress, with its drooping bell sleeves, not-yet-excessive pigeon breast, and gored skirt with ruffled hem, is absolutely typical of fashionable 1900s dress.  The S-curve has yet to reach its most outrageous proportions, but is definitely in evidence.  The only throw-back is the sleeve heads, which retain a slight fullness. The …

Ladies Home Journal, June 1910 thedreamstress.com

Some social commentary on corsets, 1910

I bought the June 1910 issue of the Ladies Home Journal (it was the American Fashion Number!) when I was in the US, and thought I should share this fascinating piece of corset related social commentary from it with you: And if you can’t quite read that one: So many layers! The anti-tightlacing message, right as longline corsets came into fashion. The message that corsets should be looser, without even a hint of a suggestion that they should be left off. The weird overtones about fertility. The use of ‘man’ and ‘girl’. The idea that women dress for men. The mansplaining…