All posts tagged: weddings

Real brides of 1911

We’ve looked at fashion magazines, extent wedding dresses, and discussed one of the fabrics used in them.  Now it’s time to look at real Titanic-era brides. These wedding photos tell us so much that the fashion plates and extent dresses can’t quite convey: what the brides wore with their dress, the flowers they carried, how they actually looked in the dress, and what styles were popular (as opposed to what styles survived, and what styles the fashion magazines promoted) Satin skirt, lace blouse, high neck.  Roses and ferns for the bride, chrysanthemums for the bridesmaid.  And I’m pretty sure the groomsman in the back is giving the photographers pretty assistant the eye 😉 Lashings of roses all round, a very poofy veil, and adorable bobbles on the brides tunic, yoke, and sleeves. A very fashionable bride in satin with some sort of embellishment near the hem.  Her flowers look like fake studio flowers. A groom in gloves, and a bride with beautifully pintucked skirt and a chrysanthemum bouquet tied with a huge bow. A very …

Shell’s dress: a zip and buttons

You’ve seen the extraordinary buttons for Shell’s dress already, but I haven’t really told you about how it fastens. It closes with a zip under the false buttons. Yes, that’s right, I caved and did the ultimate wedding dress cliché.  It’s a cliché for a reason though: buttons by themselves would have a hard time holding such a fitted strapless bodice, and would be a pain to fasten, so the zip is necessary, but brides love that buttons up the back look. Since it isn’t a historical technique, a zip under buttons is not something I have ever had occasion to do before. It also isn’t something that you can currently find any instructions or guides on how to do on the internet. So I did a few trial runs, and guessed, and went for it. It came out very well: when the dress is on and the buttons are fastened its almost impossible to tell there is a zip under them.  This was very important to Shell.  Initially she was almost as anti zip-under-buttons …

Real wedding dresses of 1911

Continuing with our 1911 wedding theme, here are some stunning extent 1911ish wedding dresses: One from 1909, but on the cutting edge of fashion, so I’m including it: Quite a daringly low neckline for a wedding dress!  It was probably worn over a guimpe.  I love the satin on satin overtunic with a train. Anyone recognise what collection this is out of?  I know I know that background, but can’t place it.  The dress is such a great example of Medieval revivalism in the 19teens. Continuing the satin theme, a classic satin sheath with a bit of ruching and lace and a full train.  Also probably worn with a giumpe, as is the next one: This wedding dress looks like it has a marquisette tunic, just like Tara’s great-grandmothers (and yes, that’s a hint about tomorrow’s terminology post). I just LOVE this Russian wedding dress.  I can’t quite tell what is going on at the hem, but it just ads to the overall graphic simplicity.  It manages to be both very traditionally wedding-y, and quite …