39 Search Results for: 1916 fortnight

A Fortnight in 1916

From July 4th to July 18th 2016  I spent a fortnight attempting to dress, eat, and live as much like a middle class Wellington housewife would have in the winter of 1916 as it was  possible for me to do. While my experiment wasn’t  a perfect recreation of life in 1916, the project still provided a significant base for understanding everyday life in the period, and will hopefully be a jumping-off point for  pursuing further living history research. Blog posts about the project: Introducing the 1916 project – how the idea came about. A Fortnight in 1916: Guidelines for the project. A sewing machine for 1916: meet my new (very old) 1893 Singer 27 The Fornight in 1916: And so it begins – reflections on the first day Doing laundry in 1916 – research on laundry in 1916 Doing laundry in 1916 – the part where I actually do it. The halfway point – reflections a week in. 1916 Megrims – when the project got hard. Eating in 1916: a dinner 1916: it gets better …

A Fortnight in 1916: Clothing

You’ve gotten some hints, but many people have asked what my wardrobe was like for my Fortnight in 1916. I did a great deal of research in diaries and newspaper articles, and assembled what I thought resembled a fairly middle of the road wardrobe for a housewife to wear during a two week period in Wellington in August 1916.  One thing my researched revealed is that, just like today, there was probably a fair amount of variation in wardrobes, even in the same social class.  Some of us own dozens of bras, some of us own 2: the same was true in 1916. Here, however, is my best guess at what a middle class Wellington housewife would have worn over a two week period in winter 1916 (eta: her total wardrobe would have been bigger, particularly in terms of accessories, one or two nice outfits, and seasonal items, but that didn’t come up in my fortnight): Five combinations: My research indicates very poor women only had one set of undergarments, and even some ‘middle class’ …

A Fortnight in 1916: the halfway point

I’m halfway through the Fortnight in 1916 project – 7 days of life in 1916 down, 7 more to go. What’s going well so far, and what’s been hard? Things that are better/easier than I expected: Food: I really thought the 1916 diet would be a struggle, and was quite worried about some of the dishes, but most of them have been very pleasant surprises.  The emphasis on fish (over mutton and other meat, which was being exported to Britain in large quantities), the wide variety of vegetarian dishes (evidence suggests it was a reasonably popular trend in 1910s NZ), and the reduction in bread (due to its high cost during the war) have helped.  I’ve really been enjoying things like swedes and steamed cauliflower, and  I haven’t been craving fresh greens, nor fruit other than apples, nor seasonings like garlic and ginger that usually feature heavily in my cooking.  There is actually a lot of vegetables – just in slightly different forms.  While the cooking is all quite simple, you are generally using fresh, …