18th Century, Tutorial

Mariana Victoria: Dyeing to show you

One of my big projects this year will be a 1720s robe de cour for Demode’s 18th century Court Gowns project based on Alexis Simon Belle’s portrait-within-a-portrait of Mariana Victoria of Spain (and of course the various bits of it will also qualify for Historical Sew Fortnightly challenges).

Alexis Simon Belle (1674–1734) , Portrait of Louis XV as a child pointing to a portrait of his fiancée the Infanta Mariana Victoria of Spain, circa 1723

Alexis Simon Belle (1674–1734) , Portrait of Louis XV as a child pointing to a portrait of his fiancée the Infanta Mariana Victoria of Spain, circa 1723

The first thing to do was to dye my fabric.

When I signed up for the project the deal I made with myself was that I could only do it if I could do it from my stash.  Because of this, I’m going to have to compromise a tiny bit on historical accuracy.  For my fabric I’m using two 2.7m lengths of vintage mercerised cotton damask curtains (yes, I really am trying to do a court dress out of 5.4m of fabric!) in dull beige-gold, and one smaller scrap:

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com
Sadly, not silk, but the pattern isn’t too bad of a match for what you can see of MV’s dress, and the colour can be improved on.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

So, to dye the curtains.  First I washed them thoroughly, to get rid of any soiling or accretions that may have accumulated over time and which would keep my fabric from dyeing a nice even colour.  Once it was clean I got the fabric soaking wet:

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

I prefer stovetop dyeing, because, while it is more work than dyeing in the washing machine, you  have more control over what colour you achieve on the stovetop.  Washing machine dyeing also works if you don’t have room in your kitchen, or don’t have a dedicated dye-pot.

To dye on the stove I got my pot filled with water, brought the water to a boil, and added salt to help the colour affix to the cotton (following the instruction on the packet for water/salt to fabric ratio).  Then I got out my selection of yellow dyes (bless Made on Marion for carrying such an extensive range of dyes!). I prefer iDye for dyeing, but there are other brands that also work beautifully.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

I trialled a mix of Bright Yellow (bottom) and Aztec Gold (middle) on a teeny scrap of fabric, dipping it in the dye and then drying it to see what it would really look like, but the result was too pumpkin-orange:

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

So I went for unadulterated Golden Ochre, which had the right mix of deep golden yellow to match MV’s dress.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

iDye comes in little dissolvable packets: you just tip the entire packet into your dye pot, and don’t have to handle any messy dye powder.  Here you can see my little packet dissolving amidst the steam:

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

Once my packet had dissolved I stirred my pot like mad to make sure that the dye was evenly dispersed in the water.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

Then I added my soaking wet fabric, and stirred even more vigorously.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

It’s very important at this point that I agitate the fabric thoroughly, so that every bit of it gets evenly exposed to the dye: otherwise my fabric will come out blotchy and uneven.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

So I stirred like mad, while timing the dye job to be sure to get the right depth of colour.  Too short, and the colour would be too weak and pale.  Too long, and the colour will be too dark and orange-y.

When I’d reached the right time I dumped the fabric (but not the dye) out into the sink, and rinsed it with cold water until the water running out from it ran clear, and there was no residual dye.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

Then I hung it out on the line to dry, and dyed my other 2.7m length and the smaller scrap in the same way.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

And here is what it came out as:

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

The fabric nearer Felicity is perfect, but the other length is a bit too pale.  Not a problem though: I could re-dye it.  So I re-heated my leftover dye, got the second length of fabric soaking wet again, popped it in the dye pot for a wee bit longer, stirred like mad, and dried it again.

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

Ooooh…glorious!

Dyeing fabric for the Mariana Victoria dress thedreamstress.com

 

In the sunshine it looks much brighter than Mariana Victoria’s dress, but in a candlelit room it would be perfect (and, of course, Belle’s painting has probably darkened with time).

So now that I’ve got my fabric right, it’s time to cut out the skirt petticoat and the bodice, and to sew up the bodice for the HSF Bodice Challenge, which is due in oh, 9 days…

And I’m still working on The Project, thought the biggest part of it is over!

11 Comments

  1. Oooh! I’m not a big fan of yellow but this is glorious. It looks so heavy and court dressy.

  2. Oh wow! What a gorgeous colour. I wasn’t too keen on the fabric in its original shade, but now that you’ve dyed it I’m totally in love with it. I’m really looking forward to seeing the bodice.

  3. Lynne says

    Beautiful colour! So rich and satisfying.

    What a lovely subtle dye range that looks to be – lovely to work with. I was a Dylon woman – they had a bit less choice. Though I did find someone had written a great poem about dyeing things with Dylon. May I share? Assuming I can find it, of course!

    • Thank you! Dylon is great too, and I often dye by mixing colours, I just find iDye a little easier to work with. And I’d love to hear the poem!

      • Lynne says

        Life work

        Ones who might miss me
        are the makers of No 17 Dylon, a splendid navy.
        They’ll wonder why it is not selling so well,
        why the shops do not reorder it constantly.

        What sporting days I’ve had –
        ‘…see that the article to be dyed
        is thoroughly clean’, immersing
        one tired thing after another, coming up

        with an array of shades, all fine,
        all zenithal – depending on wear and fabric –
        cerulean, inky, indigo –
        nothing, thank heaven, in the least navy.

        At the end of the session the most
        predictable thing the dyer’s hands –
        older, shinier, too blue safely
        to handle food, pointing apologies

        – for this day of child’s play –
        to the things that will colour the house
        and family with the blending distinction,
        for a while, of No 17 Navy.

        A.A.Cleary

  4. Oh, you do love yellow, don’t you?
    Yellow is usually one of my least favorite colors, but you are always causing me to want to make a yellow dress! I think you could convert anyone in the world to loving yellow! 😀
    The fabric is so lovely and even more delightful seeing it go from that beige color to that pretty golden yellow!
    Good luck on this project; I can’t wait to see how you turn it out! 🙂

  5. Thank you for the dyeing instructions. My only experiences with dyeing haven’t exactly been successful, but I need to plunge in and try to learn it some day.

  6. Beatrix says

    That is gorgeous.
    Now i’m all inspired to take down the boring ecru silk curtains in our Delhi flat to dye me some GOLDEN OCHRE draperies!
    Or maybe even a brilliant saffron orange, I need some Bollywood color!

  7. Elise says

    Wow! The packets! The packets! It makes it so easy!

Comments are closed.