Sewing
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The 1790s jumps of disappointment

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

A month ago I blogged about making 1790s jumps that finally fit well and were super comfortable.

In blogging about them, I realised I made a pair of jumps last year that I never blogged about – because they didn’t fit well, and weren’t super comfortable.

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com
1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

These jumps are based on one of the 1790s corset pattern in Jill Salen.

I loved the multiple back panels in the original, and the little tails they formed.

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

However, there were other elements of the original I didn’t love so much: tabs cut along the front that didn’t seem to do anything and would have been so much work to bind, so I adapted the pattern based on a few other extant pairs of jumps, and other patterns.

Unfortunately, partly because of my alterations, partly because of the original pattern, (and possibly because I did a weird job grading the pattern up) these did not turn out well.

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

They look cute lying flat, but on a person? Not so much.

The pattern was weird to start with: when I resized them to fit me I either ended up with a pattern that was proportionally WAY too wide across the back, or way too wide across the front, and cutting in to my front arms. To achieve a reasonable fit I had to change the proportions of the pattern a significant amount.

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

And then they still don’t fit well. There are weird bubbles and bulges up the back, gaping across the back, and very high in the back.

With a lot of tweaking (and removing of bones) I got them to fit me, and be comfortable-ish, but they still aren’t great.

I mean, I understand bum-rumps were fashionable, but why do these stays have space to smuggle a whole battalions worth of handkerchiefs under the back panels?

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com
1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

Because they were so disappointing I haven’t taken proper on-me photos. I’ll do that the next time I have occasion to pull them out.

They have been worn though: I’ve already lent them out to a number of friends for Regency events.

So, a win?

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

But I might need to re-check them against the pattern, and cut in and bind those front tabs. They would be a good candidate for an ‘eco-costumer re-make the things that weren’t great instead of making new’ post…

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

What the item is: 1790s front-lacing jumps

Material: Midweight brown linen inner, light-midweight white linen outer

Pattern: 1790s stays pattern from Jaill Salen’s ‘Corsets’, with some adaptations based on other jumps and stays of the era

Year: ca. 1795

Notions: metal boning, cotton twill tape

How historically accurate is it? Not particularly – the fabrics are OK, I think, but I machine sewed most of it, and used metal bones (instead of whalebone). I meant these as working toiles, so I’m not too fussed about the accuracy. But hey, there are hand-worked eyelets! (using a stitch that it turns out I can’t find any evidence for on jumps of this period, so…)

Hours to complete: 20 ish.

First worn: April 30th, to fit a bodice over

Total cost: Under $10, all the materials except for the bones were thrifted

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com
1790s jumps based on a pattern in Jill Salen's 'Corsets' thedreamstress.com

3 Comments

  1. I want to try making 1790s jumps at some point, they look so comfortable. In many ways, they remind me of modern sports bras.

  2. Elise says

    Well, artists and scientists need to experiment. Thanks for letting us peek into the process, even the messy parts.

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