All posts tagged: tea gown

Tea Gown, House of Worth (French, 1858–1956), ca. 1910, French, silk, rhinestones, metal, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.3277

Rate the Dress: a Worth tea gown for the wealthiest woman

I gave you an extra few days for Rate the Dress, because last week’s was so late. And I’m still feeling very rushed and busy, so have picked a Rate the Dress that’s all about relaxing, albeit in the poshest way possible. Last Week: an 1860s fancy dress Last week’s Rate the dress was fancy in a different way to this weeks: fancy dress, rather than fancy, fancy. But what we could see of the trim and construction was also quite fancy: indicating a very well made, high quality item, for a client with money to spend on a one-off costume. But that didn’t translate to likes: the ratings were all over the place, from 2 to 10. The final result? The Total: 6.4 out of 10 Personally, I have a sneaking suspicion it would have rated much higher if we could have seen how it was worn: fully accessorised and styled. This week: a tea gown by the House of Worth Tea gowns were always status symbols: the Victorian & Edwardian versions of designer jeans …

Rate the Dress: Tea Gown Time

Well, I appear to be on a theme roll, because once again I’ve picked a dress with front view vs back view. This one is quite intentional though: it’s a tea gown with a specific over-robe effect. Last Week: an early 1860s dress in blue floral silk Last week’s dress was the opposite of the week before’s. A fortnight ago you liked the back view but not the front, last week you loved the front, but if you had any quibbles it was that you thought the additional back tails were awkward and misplaced. The dress was also quite different to last weeks in that many of you absolutely loved it – somewhat to my surprise. The Total: 8.9 out of 10 Not quite perfection, but getting there! This week: an 1890s Liberty Tea Gown This Liberty tea gown has all the classic elements that make a tea gown: a robe effect with an unbroken line flowing past the waist, rather decadent sleeves, and elements of exoticism and romantic historicism. It’s no surprise this tea gown …

Rate the Dress: a tea gown with attitude

Today was a public holiday in New Zealand (Waitangi Day).  Most people took a four day weekend, so it’s thrown my usual scheduling out.  So apologies for the slightly belated Rate the Dress.  To make up for it, I’ve picked a VERY exciting Rate the Dress: a relatively unknown 1890s Pingat tea gown (probably) that caused quite a stir when I shared it on Instagram earlier this week. Last week: a ca. 1820 dress re-made from 18th century chiné a la branche I’m on a Rate-the-dress roll!  Once again, the majority of you loved the frock, though there were a few caveats.  The two main complaints were about the wide sleeves, the sleeve trim, and the muted colours.  Wider, more relaxed sleeves were often a feature of late 1810s fashions.  Chiné, by its nature, is muted, and this was a particularly restrained example. The Total: 8.7 out of 10 Not quite as good as the week before, but still a very good score indeed. This week: A c. 1892 Pingat ‘tea dress’ or tea gown Since some …