16 Search Results for: engageantes

One less PHD – 1860s Engageantes

I’ve got a more elaborate finished UFO to show you for the Historical Sew Fortnightly Challenge #8, but I haven’t managed to take photos of it yet, so for now here is a simple, soft entry, or a really elaborate, long-running entry, depending on how I think about it: I’ve been struggling with engageantes (the false sleeves worn under pagoda sleeves in the 19th century) for the Greek Key tea dress ever since I first made the dress.  My problem is that 1) none of the engageantes patterns explain exactly how one gets the engageantes to stay attached and up when wearing them, and 2) none of the engageantes patterns make up into something that looks like fashion plates depicting women wearing engageantes.  They just aren’t as full. The second problem I’m ascribing at least in large part to exaggeration in styles in fashion plates. The first problem…well, that’s a sticky one. My most recent trial of engageantes (4 years ago) involved the pattern from Janet Arnold, scaled up slightly on the assumption that I’m built …

1760s Frou-Frou Française thedreamstress.com

1760s Frou Frou Francaise

The Idea and Inspiration behind the française: Back in late 2009 or early 2010 I found the most glorious, scrumptious silk taffeta in pale blue at The Fabric Store (back when it was Global Fabrics!). It just begged to be made into a Robe a la Française. I love the 1750s and 1760s – hair is still low, ruffles are in abundance, and styling is at the the peak of Rococo frothiness. While the French styles of this era, epitomised by Madame de Pompadour, are gorgeous, I prefer the more restrained English take on the 1760s sacque. I have a particularly fondness for punched silk trim: it’s such a typically 18th century touch. So, that was the inspiration: a 1760s française in the frothiest version of the English style, with punched silk trim. The taffeta fabric gave the dress its name: the Frou-Frou Française. Little did I know when I started it, but the Frou-Frou Française would take seven years to finish, and that by the time I had finished it I would have sewn …