All posts tagged: 17th century

Terminology: What is a robe de cour or grand habit?

Synchronisity is an amazing thing.  I wrote this post in January of 2012, and got it completely finished all save one last quote from Queen of Fashion that I wanted to add, and then got distracted and never published it.  And then, at the beginning of August, I came across my not-published post, and went to the library to borrow Queen of Fashion, only to find it was out.  Literally two days later Kendra at Demode posted about making a robe de coer and started the 2014 18th Court Ensembles Project. Well, Queen of Fashion has finally come back in, and just in time, because I’ve finally been tempted into joining the Court Ensembles project.  I actually have the beginnings of a 17th century robe de cour in my UFO pile, but it’s not 18th century, so instead I’ll be making this: Obviously I mean Mariana Victoria (yellow-gold brocade….rrrrow), though if things go really well Mr D is going to find himself sporting a russet velvet justacorpse. So, now that I’m making one, what is …

Rate the Dress: Sophie of Hanover, Princess of all the things

Well, it was a hard hill for Tissot’s Princesse de Broglie to climb, pitting her against Ingres’ Princesse de Broglie in last weeks Princess-Off.  Ingres’ painting is so well know, and so beloved, that any frock would have to struggle against it.  Still, it was an interesting battle, and I think Ingres’s princess did more poorly than she might have on her own, as Tissot’s avant-garde princess highlighted how safe and cliché her earlier counterpart’s frock was.  Still, Ingres’s 1850s Josephiné was the clear winner, with 7.6 points out of 10, while Tissot’s 1890s Pauline could only manage 6.6 out of 10. I’ve been wanting to showcase this painting as a ‘Rate the Dress’ for ages.  ‘Pretty, Pretty, Princess’ fortnight seemed the perfect opportunity, and then, with uncanny timing, Willow on facebook asked if the Electress Sophia of Hanover counts as a princess. Does she ever!  Sophia was the daughter of the Winter King & Queen of Bohemia (and he was also the Elector Palatine), the granddaughter of the King of England, the wife of the …

Rate the Dress: the embellished man of 1673

Last week most of you loooooved the late 1870s gold dress, with its asymmetry and embellishment.  But some of you found the asymmetry off-putting, or the restrained colour a bit dull, dragging the rating down to 7.4 out of 10. I actually really wanted to show you something 1930s this week – something bright and modern and Art Deco.  But I couldn’t find a single garment that took my fancy, so I’ve decided on a Rate the Dress that is a retaliation against other clothing that doesn’t take my fancy: modern menswear.  Modern male clothing is sadly devoid of embellishment, but that hasn’t always been the case. This 1670s formal suit from the V&A, worn to the wedding of James, Duke of York, is extremely embellished, with almost every surface covered in gilt embroidery.  Despite this, the suit looks subdued, but this is a bit misleading: the green background fabric has faded at least a few shades, and would have contrasted with the vivid flame (that quintessential later half of the 17th century colour) cuffs, …