All posts tagged: millinery

A 1910s-20s hat re-fashion

A 1910s-20s hat re-re-re-re-make

Welcome to a long, involved story about how a hat went through many design permutations before it finally became a lovely thing that I enjoy wearing! I originally (all the way back in April 2017…) started out wanting to make this Lily Elsie mushroom hat to wear with my Miss Muffet dress: I began with a fairly generic straw sunhat I’d found at an op shop. I soaked it and re-shaped it over a hat-block and towels to get that mushroom shape. Somewhere there are photos of the process, but I just can’t find them. Update: I have found one of the original re-shaping photos! The curved-up back brim is based on a catalogue image from 1913: And…it looked terrible on me. So it went in the naughty pile. And then I needed a hat to go with the 1918-19 Not Another Blue Dress, so it came back out, and I re-shaped it again intp a shape halfway between this painting: And the bottom left hat: And then added a dark blue ribbon under the …

1910s Tricorne Revival Hat thedreamstress.com

A 1900s-1910s tricorne revival hat

The Research: About this time last year I became slightly obsessed (as I do) with the early 20th century bicorne and tricorn hat revival: The tricorne revival was part of the overall 18th century revival that happened at the end of the 19th century, and flowed into an Empire revival in the late 1900s and early 1910s. (more examples are on my pinterest page for the topic) What’s not to love about it? It’s 18th century meets my favourite timeperiod, it’s wacky and quirky and a little bit pirate-y! There are mentions of tricorne & bicorne hats being fashionable as early as 1897, and the tricorne revival lasted until the mid 1920s.  Within the period there are definite changes – early tricorne revival hats, are generally very large, like turned-up picture hats, and are overflowing with feathers and flowers.  As the 1900s progress, the hats become smaller and more streamlined.  Mid-1910s examples are often quite severe, with only one upstanding feather tuft, or a sculptural bit of ribbon.  Asymmetry is another major trend in mid-teens …

Fabulous hats of Spring 1940

I just love this ad for hats that appeared in the Evening Post in September 1940.  Isn’t the little bowler with cherries just delicious?   Sadly, C Smiths has long since closed, and though the building still stands it now holds a prosaic collection of shoe stores and pharmacies and a gym, and renovators are gleefully stripping all its Art Deco charm from the interior and replacing it with the corporate colours of whatever the latest chain store to occupy the space are.  The romance of an old department store that once sold fabulous hats is long gone.