Scroop Patterns
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Introducing the 1780s Augusta Stays pattern!

Meet the Augusta Stays pattern: the perfect foundation for your late 18th century wardrobe.  

The Scroop Patterns & Virgil's Fine Goods Augusta Stays scrooppatterns.com

Buy the pattern here!

With two bust-to-waist ration size sets, to make fitting as easy as possible, and both historically accurate and theatrical pattern pieces and sewing instructions, the pattern has everything you need to make beautiful stays – whether they are perfectly historically accurate, quick and easy theatrical versions, or a combination of both. 

The Scroop Patterns & Virgil's Fine Goods Augusta Stays scrooppatterns.com

The pattern comes in bust sizes 30″-52″ (76-132cm), with the options for a ‘straight’ fit, which has a finished garment measurement 10″ smaller than the bust, and a ‘curvy’ fit, which has a finished garment measurements 12″ smaller than the bust.

The historically accurate pattern features adjustable partial front lacing, full back lacing, three layers of construction fabric, tape binding, and an optional loose lining and optional taped seams. 

The Scroop Patterns & Virgil's Fine Goods Augusta Stays scrooppatterns.com

The theatrical versions features a solid front piece, two layers of construction fabrics, an optional decorative outer layer, metal lacing grommets, and bias binding.  

The Scroop Patterns & Virgil's Fine Goods Augusta Stays scrooppatterns.com

Both versions are spiral laced and use synthetic whalebone (German plastic boning).

The Augusta Stays are the first collaboration between Scroop Patterns and Virgil’s Fine Goods, combining Amber of Virgil’s Fine Goods’ extensive mantua making skills, with my patternmaking skills.  

The Scroop Patterns & Virgil's Fine Goods Augusta Stays scrooppatterns.com

Our goal is to bring you easy-to-use historical patterns with extensive size ranges and detailed historically-accurate instructions that are available as downloadable print-at-home patterns anywhere in the world, to make historical sewing more accessible to sewists everywhere.

The Scroop Patterns & Virgil's Fine Goods Augusta Stays scrooppatterns.com

This is by far the most detailed and ambitious pattern that we’ve done for Scroop, and we are so excited to see what you make from it!

Buy the pattern here!


7 Comments

  1. Oh this is so great! Though I’m not a historical sewer myself (yet) I love to lurk on the side lines and I’m always so impressed by the simple amount of research work that goes into drafting and planning each garment. And while I can totally see how that can be part of the fun it’s also hella intimidating if like me you wouldn’t even know where to start. So having awesome looking patterns (with instructions! for lotsa different bodies! and lots of different aspirations!) as a base is just so so great! Thank you both! If I ever do decide to start I know where I’ll come back to 🙂

  2. Exciting! Congratulations on the release of the pattern! I will keep this in mind when I eventually get around to making myself new stays from this period.

    Best,
    Quinn

  3. Exciting! Congratulations on the release of the pattern! I will keep this in mind when I eventually get around to making myself new stays from this period.

    Best,
    Quinn

  4. Kate McLoughlin says

    So exciting!

    I have a query about the size range descriptions though – it says ‘less natural bust-to-waist waist’ a few times, does it mean ‘smaller natural bust-to-waist’? Right now it reads as ‘not as natural’ which I don’t think is what you meant, and also is confusing. Sorry to nitpick, I just legitimately spent two minutes squinting at it trying to work out what size range I would pick!

    • Thank you for the feedback! Sorry you’re finding that confusing! We had a significant amount of discussion about this with the testers and my editor, and we agreed that the phrasing we settled on was the clearest & shortest way to express a somewhat hard-to-express-in-a-tidy-way concept. My editor was VERY firm that ‘smaller natural bust to waist’ definitely isn’t right. Smaller and less don’t mean quite the same thing. Less means ‘not as much’ as in ‘less of a difference between the bust and the waist’ or ‘less natural bust to waist ratio’. Smaller means littler, and would imply that either the bust or waist was little.

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