All posts tagged: Hawaii

Canistel (eggfruit) tree, Hawaii, 2016, thedreamstress.com

Fruits on the farm: what are canistel (eggfruit or yellow sapote)

My parents have an organic permaculture farm on Moloka’i, with vegetables and ducks, and LOTS of varieties of tropical fruit. There are common ones like bananas (at least five varieties), papaya and lilikoi (passionfruit); Pacific specific ones like ohia ‘ai (mountain apple) and breadfruit; slightly exotic ones like cacao (chocolate), lychee and carambola (starfruit); and really exotic ones like rambutan, jaboticaba, and canistel (eggfruit). I mentioned the last one on facebook, and a number of people asked what a canistel (which I actually misspelled as canistelle) is. This is a slightly green canistel (Pouteria campechiana) on the tree: And a ripe one: It’s also known as eggfruit, because the flesh is the deep yellow of an egg yolk, and, rather than being juicy like most fruit, is dry and flaky in the same way that a hard-boiled egg is dry and flaky. It’s really hard to describe the flavour of canistel, but the closest comparison is that it is like a really, really good pumpkin pie.*  It’s rich, and dry and flaky, and very sweet, …

Slugfest 2016 (or, the grossest post I’ll ever write)

(obviously, if you’re squeamish about slugs you should avoid this post) It rained last night, and we woke up to overcast skies and the occasional light drizzle. Rain or no rain, a farm still has to run, and it was fruit harvesting day, so after breakfast Mum put me on to picking limes. The lime trees sit on the edge of the farm, on the rough slope where the flat bed of the valley rises steeply up into rocky valley walls. Picking the limes involves scrambling amongst the rocks, peering up into the tree and using a grab-and-twist picker to bring down the ripest fruit. Last year the limes got pruned, and some of the cut branches were left sitting under the trees, a tangle of delicate stems and sharp thorns. Climbing up amongst the rocks towards the lime tree, I discovered what happens to dead lime branches on moist*, damp days. They get covered in slugs. Covered. Like over-decorated Christmas trees, only with brown, slimey garlands, instead of lovely silver tinsel. Slugs, it seems, …

Hallelujah textiles: A 1930s Hawaiian playsuit

Do you collect vintage or historical textiles? If you do, you know there are the things on your wish list that you search for, and save up for, and eventually manage to get.  And then there are the things that are so rare, and amazing, and desirable that whenever they do show up for sale they are so ridiculously beyond your price range that it’s not possible.  Or the things that just never show up, because they were SO rare in the first place. I tend to collect more by chance than design.  I don’t love shopping on the internet, which limits my options a lot, and I like the thrill of finding something unexpected at an op-shop or antique store.  And I like the unexpected stories that develop out of a less-planned collection. Still, there are some things that I desperately hope that one day I’ll get to love and care for and study.  My holy grails.  My ultimate wish list.  Hallelujah textiles.  I was lucky enough to be gifted an amazing quilted petticoat by the …