Scroop Patterns
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Edwardian Unders: what went under the Persis Corset samples

Scroop Persis Corset scrooppatterns.com

What do you need if you have a photoshoot with corset samples?  Pretty unders to wear with the corset – and which also have enough coverage to make the models feel comfortable!

I used the Persis Corset pattern shoot as an opportunity to play with different underthings patterns, and with the lace insertion techniques given in the Ettie Petticoat Pattern.  Because who doesn’t love lacy drawers?

I made three items to go with the Persis Corset samples: a chemise, drawers, and combinations.  My primary source for all three patterns was Cutting Out for Student Teachers (1906).  I also took inspiration from a number of other pattern books in my collection for trim ideas, and to refine the patterns for the best fit.

Cutting Out For Student Teachers thedreamstress.com

The Chemise & Drawers Unders Set worn with View B

Scroop Persis Corset View B scrooppatterns.com

For View B I decided on a separate chemise and drawers, to give the person who this set would eventually belong to (I don’t believe in making pattern samples that aren’t going to get used again!) the most flexibility.

For the shoot we tucked the chemise into the drawers.  This provided the model with a further layer of modesty, and allowed me to show off the pretty drawers.

Both chemise and drawers are made from very soft, lightweight striped cotton sateen, with matching lace on both.

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

The drawers are circular cut (which the book calls ‘American cut’, which I think is just delightful!), and have a lace trimmed ruffle attached to the hem with insertion lace

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

Attaching a ruffle with insertion work was a fun challenge, but it paid off.  I also love the way the stripes work with the circle cut of the drawers:

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

The drawers fasten at the front with a button, and have a clever drawstring at the back, to make them adjustable.  The drawstring technique is borrowed from a couple of extant petticoats in my collection, but I’ve also seen it on at least 1 pair of drawers.

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

The drawers are split drawers, but I machine basted them closed for the photoshoot for the comfort of the model.

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

The chemise features a square neckline, and a pointed yoke that echoes the neckline of View B.

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

Scroop Persis Corset View B scrooppatterns.com

I’d have to have a play with this, but I think it would be possible to leave out the inset and straight neckline of the yoke, to create a chemise with a lower sweetheart neckline.

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

The Combination Unders Worn with View A:

Scroop Persis Corset View A scrooppatterns.com

My inspiration for the combinations was this pair in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (just with slightly less insertion work!).  I liked the front fastening, brief bodice, and the angled outside legs with their bow trim.  This pair has similar elements, just without the side bows.

 

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

I used this beautiful broderie anglaise for the ruffle, and attached it with broderie anglaise beading trim.  A ribbon went through the beading with a bodkin to create the side bows:

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

I had exactly enough of the broderie anglaise trim left to create a decorative central panel for the bodice:

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

The middle is a placket which will have buttons.  The join of the lace to the bodice fabric is hidden with a tuck:

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

With all these pretty details this should rightly be a chemise to wear over a corset to smooth out the lines, rather than one worn under it.  With very narrow seams and finishing, and nice flat buttons, it was comfortable under a corset.

Edwardian Underthings thedreamstress.com

Scroop Persis Corset scrooppatterns.com

Conclusions, and a question…

I was very happy with how both of these turned out.   The models were comfortable, they look good, and the owner of the chemise and drawers is delighted with her new under set.*  What more could you ask for?

*Obviously it was well laundered and she knew it was used for this!

So, the question. Would you be interested in patterns for these items?

And the question is a hint about something that will be happening this week…

7 Comments

  1. Agnes says

    Those are so beautiful!! Of course I’d like a pattern for these! How could I say no? 😀

  2. Nur says

    Ooooh, Scroop instructions are quite good! I’d snag the patterns for Skill Level Up alone, even if I don’t end up making these specific unmentionables.

  3. Emily Sturgeon says

    My teen will be volunteering at a museum next summer and would LOVE a set of combinations! We would love to make them from one of your patterns. (She is already addicted to her fantail skirt.)

  4. Sally Hughes says

    You know we need saucy draws for our corsets!! And i think combinations could make a comeback… much like witches britches! Yes please

  5. Natalie Ferguson says

    Ooh, yes, pretty please!
    Scroop patterns and directions are wonderful. I have the Wonderful Unders and love them.
    Very best,
    Natalie across the pond.

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