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Otari Hoodie Sew Along thedreamstress.com

The Otari Sew Along #1: Choosing fabric

As a sewing teacher I feel that choosing the right fabric can make or break a project, so it makes sense to start the Otari Hoodie Sew-Along at the very beginning: choosing fabric.

The Otari Hoodie by Scroop Patterns scrooppatterns.com

 

The goal with any project is to think about what characteristics you want the finished garment to have (drape, warmth, structure, weight), and then choose fabrics that when combined, will have all those characteristics.  A garment that depends on drape needs an outer and lining that are equally drapey.  A structured garment needs stiffer fabric, or the addition of interfacing or flat lining to a softer, less structured fabric.  Etc. Etc.

With the Otari Hoodie, you want enough stretch in all your fabrics that the hoodie moves with you.  The main body can have a bit less stretch, but it’s important that the cuff and hem band have lots.  The cuff, pocket binding, and hem band also need good recovery, so that the shape of the hoodie stays crisp over many wears.

You also want to make sure that the combination of fabrics at any given point isn’t too thick.  If you’re using a heavier body fabric, it’s important to use a very light lining fabric, and a lighter pocket binding fabric, so that the hoodie isn’t too bulky where the pocket joins the zip.

1 Otari Hoodie - Choosing Fabric thedreamstress.com

Recommended Fabrics:

Body: Midweight knit fabrics such as: midweight cotton sweatshirting, waffle knits, heavier merino knits, etc. with 20%-40% stretch across the width.

Cuff, Pocket Binding & Hem Band: Midweight jersey or ribbed knit with added spandex for good recovery and 30-40% stretch across the width.

Pocket & Hood linings: Lightweight knit fabric with 20%-40% stretch across the width. View B pocket lining fabric should have added spandex for good recovery – this is important because it helps the pocket to hold its shape with wear and use.

For the Sew Along I’m going to be making two hoodies:

Hoodie 1:  View A (possibly with View B pockets)

1 Otari Hoodie - Choosing Fabric thedreamstress.com

I’ll be making this one in a fancy teal & navy jacquard woven merino double-knit, with navy merino bindings.

The double-knit body fabric is 100% merino and has 30% stretch across the width, and just under 10% stretch along the length.

The contrast binding fabric is 96% merino, 4% elastane (spandex) and  has 40% stretch across the width, and 10% stretch along the length.

The contrast fabric is quite thin, to balance the thick, fluffy double-knit, but has excellent recovery, so is strong enough to hold its shape as bindings.

Hoodie 2: View B with View A Pockets

1 Otari Hoodie - Choosing Fabric thedreamstress.com

I’ll be making this one in navy blue merino waffle knit, with kelly green merino knit contrast.

The waffle knit body fabric is 100% merino and has 30% stretch across the width, and just under 10% stretch along the length.  It is lighter weight than the merino double-knit.

The contrast binding fabric is 96% merino, 4% elastane (spandex) and  has 40% stretch across the width, and 10% stretch along the length.  It’s the same fabric as the navy blue I’m using in Hoodie 1, just a different colour.

I’ll also be using some of the navy contrast from Hoodie 1 for my hood lining, and pocket linings.

All of my fabrics were purchases at The Fabric Store New Zealand.

Sample Otari Hoodies:

I thought you might find it helpful to look at the three Otari Hoodies I made as samples, and what fabrics I chose for them as well (especially since I’ll be using the first two to demonstrate some steps in the Sew Along).

The Otari Hoodie by Scroop Patterns scrooppatterns.com

Jenni’s Otari Hoodie is made up in powder blue floral midweight 100% cotton sweatshirting, with 20% stretch across the length and width.

The cuffs & hem band are in midweight cotton-spandex ponte, with 35% stretch across the length and width, and excellent recovery.

The hood & pocket are lined in lightweight silk-viscose-spandex.

The blue sweatshirting has the absolute minimum recommended stretch, and was near the top end of a weight I’d recommend.  Thus it was very important that the cuffs and hem band have excellent stretch and recovery, and that the linings were as lightweight as possible.

The Otari Hoodie by Scroop Patterns scrooppatterns.com

Priscilla’s Otari Hoodie is made up in black, ivory & orange striped midweight 100% cotton ribbed knit, with 25% stretch across the width, and 20% stretch along the length.

The cuffs & hem band are in midweight cotton-spandex with 35% stretch across the length and width, and excellent recovery.

The hood is in the same fabric as the body, and the pockets are lined in ivory midweight cotton-spandex with 35% stretch across the length and width.

I actually found this fabric at an op-shop – 10m for $8!  Hard to pass up.  I started using it just as toile fabric to test Otari techniques, and liked it so much I managed to make three real Otaris out of the remaining length – one for me, one for Priscilla, and one that went to another friend.

The striped cotton is a slightly tricky fabric in that it has very little recovery, so, like the sweatshirting above, needed pocket and binding fabrics that were going to add as much support as possible.  The black banding fabric is actually just barely above T-shirt weight, but it has enough spandex to give it a lot of strength.

The Otari Hoodie by Scroop Patterns scrooppatterns.com

Danielle’s Otari Hoodie is made up in denim blue floral lightweight cotton-spandex textured sweatshirting, with 30% stretch across the width and 25% stretch along the length.

The pockets, cuff & hem bands of the same fabric.  The hood and pocket are lined and bound with 100% cotton ribbed knit.

The added spandex in this fabric made it very easy to work with: its robust enough to use as the cuff and hem band fabric, and to support itself as pockets, so I could use fabric with little recovery as the pocket binding.  I could have made the whole Hoodie out of the blue fabric – but a contrast is more fun!

Can’t wait to see what fabrics you pick for your Hoodies!

In the next Sew Along post:

Pattern alterations and cutting out!

Scroop IPM 2018 scrooppatterns.com

Scroop Patterns are on sale + get ready for the Otari Hoodie Sew-Along!

It’s all go for Scroop Patterns for the rest of October!

Not only is Scroop Patterns an Indie Pattern Month sponsor, but we’re having a sale to go with it!

From now until the end of October get 20% off all digital Scroop Patterns with the code:

IPM2018

IPM2018 Sale Scrooppatterns.com

But wait, there’s more…

Join me for an Otari Hoodie Sew-Along!  Starting tomorrow I’ll be covering every step of making an awesome Otari Hoodie, from choosing your fabric, to some pattern hacks, to all the finishing details.

Otari Hoodie Sew Along thedreamstress.com

Detailed posts will be here on thedreamstress.com, and you can follow along on Instagram with @scrooppatterns, and share your own progress with the tag #otarioctober

Hope to see you sewing with us!

Dinner dress, 1910–12, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.1303

Rate the Dress: Ring a Ring o Roses

This week’s Rate the Dress moves from orderly paisley, to a more unruly pattern that mixes shapes, textures and floral types with wild abandon.  Will asymmetry, fringe, and wreaths of roses over orchid lei beat out last week’s rating?

Last week: a green paisley 1850s dress  

Last week’s 1850s frock made some of you remember how disappointed you were to discover that adult life involved far too few balls (after all, what’s the point of being an adult if not tea parties and balls?), and made others think of their least favourite salad greens and dressing combination (as a farmer’s daughter, I’m very alarmed if you’re buying lettuce in that shade of green, but I have no quibble with anyone who wants to claim that mayonnaise is revolting, particularly as a salad dressing).

The Total: 8.1 out of 10

Well, it definitely beat the bustle dress of the week before!

This week:

I’m keeping with the feminine, romantic feel of last weeks dress, but in a very different era, and with a gold tinged take on feminine and romantic, rather than green.

Dinner dress, 1910–12, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.1303

Dinner dress, 1910–12, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.1303

This early 1910s dinner dress combines a fabric with a motif of rose wreaths floating over textured satin and matte orchids and leis with lace, net, braiding, oversized faux buttons, rosettes, and a net fringe.  It’s a lot, but all held together by a restrained pastel colour scheme.

Dinner dress, 1910–12, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.1303

Dinner dress, 1910–12, American, silk, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009.300.1303

The dress is identifiable as a dinner or reception dress because the neckline is higher than a ballgown, but lower and more revealing than a day dress.  The train and luxe fabric place it firmly in formal wear territory for the early 1910s.

What do you think?  Too many disparate elements, or a beautiful balance of details and subtlety?

Rate the Dress on a Scale of 1 to 10

A reminder about rating – feel free to be critical if you don’t like a thing, but make sure that your comments aren’t actually insulting to those who do like a garment.  Our different tastes are what make Rate the Dress so interesting.  It’s no fun when a comment implies that anyone who doesn’t agree with it, or who would wear a garment, is totally lacking in taste.

(as usual, nothing more complicated than a .5.  I also hugely appreciate it if you only do one rating, and set it on a line at the very end of your comment, so I can find it!  Thanks in advance!)